Four Groups of Students

Four groups of students 28 08 11

To ensure that the needs of ALL students with disabilities have been taken into consideration in the development of materials by Queensland Studies Authority (QSA) and Teaching and Learning Branch of Education Queensland (EQ)

The following is a statement of position by the Association of Special Education Administrators in Queensland (ASEAQ) and as such has been endorsed by the Management Committee of ASEAQ (September 2011).

The following information is presented to clarify various understandings about what materials and support ASEAQ believes needs to be produced by the Queensland Studies Authority (QSA) and the Teaching and Learning Branch of Education Queensland (EQ) to ensure that the needs of all students with disabilities have been taken into consideration; and to ensure that teachers of students with disabilities are not spending additional time in developing the ‘what’ and can concentrate on the ‘how’ of teaching and assessing students with disabilities. ASEAQ Management believes there are 4 (four) ‘groups’ of students who need materials and supports included in EQ produced materials to ensure a curriculum for all.

Group 1: • students with Hearing Impairment, Vision Impairment, Physical Impairment, Speech-Language Impairment or Autism Spectrum Disorder (eg Aspergers) who do not have any Intellectual Impairment or any learning difficulties, who:

  • are enrolled in primary or secondary schools
  • are doing the same curriculum/learning outcomes as their age peers
  • are being assessed on the same learning outcomes with their age peers
  • have specific Conditions planned for them in the teaching/ learning/ assessment processes

QSA and EQ need to provide to teachers and schools information about planning for onditions required so these students can access the curriculum. This needs to be included within all the Curriculum to the Classroom (C2C) documentation.

Group 2: • students with mild or moderate Intellectual Impairment or the above disabilities with mild or moderate Intellectual Impairment or learning difficulties, who:

are enrolled in primary of secondary schools

will have specific Conditions planned for them in the teaching / learning / assessment processes

may have Criteria/Characteristics planned for them in the teaching / learning / assessment processes to lessen the cognitive demand of the learning outcomes from that of their age peers:

  •  through planning for outcomes at levels prior to their chronological age level; or
  • by reducing the quantity of learning outcomes expected to be learnt and assessed
  • which means that the students are not assessed or reported against their neuro-typical age peers .

QSA and EQ needs to provide information to teachers and schools about planning for Conditions as per Group 1; AND

  • QSA and EQ needs to provide all teachers with the same level/ amount / type of information for these learning outcomes as QSA and EQ have provided for the Foundation to Year 10 learning outcomes and in their C2C support materials
  • QSA and EQ needs to provide information to teachers and schools about planning for multiple levels of Criteria / Characteristics in the teaching, learning and assessment process
  • This needs to be included within all the C2C documentation

Group 3: • students with severe Intellectual / Multiple Impairment (who may have other disabilities but for whom Intellectual Impairment is the major impairment area that impacts on their learning needs) who:

may be enrolled in primary and secondary schools and supported by their special education programs (unless living in an area where they are no special schools or parental choice is for their child not to be enrolled in a special school)

may be enrolled in special schools o are learning at levels prior to their chronological age level

have Criteria/Characteristics planned for them in the teaching/ learning/ assessment processes to lessen the cognitive demand of the learning outcomes from that of their neuro-typical age peers:

  • through planning for outcomes at levels that meet students’ needs; or
  • by reducing the quantity of learning outcomes expected to be learnt and assessed
  • which means that the students are not assessed or reported against their neuro-typical age peers.

The Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) needs to provide levels of curriculum prior to Foundation Level to ensure there is no discrimination for these students and meet ACARA’s commitment to provide a curriculum for all Australian students. This curriculum needs to be developed and presented in the same format as all the Foundation to Year 10 levels.

QSA and EQ need to provide information to teachers and schools about planning for Conditions as per Group 1; AND QSA and EQ need to provide all the same level / amount / type of information for these learning outcomes as they have for the Foundation to Year 10 learning outcomes in their support materials, especially the C2C materials. These support materials should reflect an understanding that many students will not progress through all levels prior to Foundation. There should be sufficient material to support 13 years of meaningful engagement in education.

  • QSA and EQ need to provide support materials and information to teachers and schools about planning for multiple levels of Criteria / Characteristics in the teaching, learning and assessment process
  • All the above support materials needs to be included within all the C2C documentation

Group 4: • students who have profound Intellectual Impairment and/or profound Multiple Impairment. These students o are often referred to as ‘pre-intentional’ students

  • will be enrolled in special schools (unless living in an area where they are no special schools or parental choice is for their child not to be enrolled in a special school)
  • will have Criteria/Characteristics planned for them in the teaching/ learning/ assessment processes to lessen the cognitive demand of the learning outcomes from that of their neuro-typical age peers:
  • through planning for learnings at levels that meet students’ needs o which means that the students are not assessed or reported against their neuro-typical age peers.

ACARA needs to provide levels of curriculum prior to Foundation level to ensure there is no discrimination for these students and to ensure ACARA’s enacts its commitment to provide a curriculum for all Australian students.

These levels of curriculum will need to be in addition to the four levels prior to Foundation – as current information indicates that these four levels will not meet the needs of these students.
These levels of curriculum need to be developed and presented in the same format as all the other levels.

QSA and EQ need to provide information to teachers and schools about planning for Conditions as per Group 1; AND

QSA and EQ need to provide all the same level / amount / type of information for these learning outcomes as they have for the Foundation to Year 10 learning outcomes in their support materials, especially the C2C materials. These support materials should reflect an understanding that many students will not progress through all levels prior to Foundation. There should be sufficient material to support 13 years of meaningful engagement in education.

  •  QSA and EQ need to provide information to teachers and schools about planning for multiple levels of Criteria / Characteristics in the teaching, learning and assessment process
  • All the above support materials needs to be included within all the C2C documentation

Senior Schooling

QASEL POSITION PAPER – SENIOR SCHOOLING

BACKGROUND

The last ten years has seen significant changes in what is considered relevant, challenging and meaningful curriculum for students with disabilities. Change has occurred because of:-

  • new research,
  • change in community expectations,
  • new technologies,
  • schools and teachers exploring options and challenging their own assumptions about students with disabilities and their learning.

Curriculum authorities such as the Queensland Studies Authority (QSA) and employing authorities such as the Department of Education, Training and Employment (DETE) have responded at different times and in different ways to assist schools in this journey.

The focus of much of the change has been with the Early Years Curriculum guidelines and the Essential Learnings. There are now questions being asked about Senior Schooling. Schools that have engaged successfully with these systemic curriculum documents are now looking for the equivalent materials for Senior Schooling.

There is a need within the senior schooling age group for the curriculum materials to be differentiated at the systemic level, rather than only relying on individual teachers adjusting the existing curriculum documents.

As students get older, the gap between curriculum engagement for Students with Intellectual Impairment and their chronological aged peers gets wider and the adjusting of the curriculum can be meaningless and tokenistic.

There are essentially four (4) cohorts of students whose needs differ within the senior schooling context. They include:

  1.  Students with Hearing Impairment, Vision Impairment, Physical Impairment, Speech-Language Impairment or Autism Spectrum Disorder (eg Asperger’s Syndrome) who do not have any Intellectual Impairment or any learning difficulties for whom modifications and conditional changes are necessary for access and engagement in the regular curriculum.
  2.  Students with mild or moderate Intellectual Impairment or Hearing Impairment, Vision Impairment, Physical Impairment, Speech-Language Impairment or Autism Spectrum Disorder with mild or moderate Intellectual Impairment or learning difficulties. Many of these students will have up to a three to five (3 – 5) years difference in curriculum engagement to their chronological aged peers. These students are literate, can engage with knowledge about the world and have a wide range of skills. These students with Intellectual Impairment need to engage in a wide range of learning.
  3.  Students with severe Intellectual / Multiple Impairment (who may have other disabilities but for whom Intellectual Impairment is the major impairment area that impacts on their learning needs) and who may need symbol support for most learning and communication.       These students have a wide range of interests, but may have limited capacity to share their interests.
  4.  Students who have profound Intellectual Impairment and/or profound Multiple Impairment who also have learning needs associated with sensory, communication and movement.. These students need a curriculum similar to the Progressing to Foundation documents that ACARA provided at the end of 2011 for consultation, that contain young adult contexts.

THE WAY FORWARD

  1.  For Students with Hearing Impairment, Vision Impairment, Physical Impairment, Speech-Language Impairment or Autism Spectrum Disorder (eg Asperger’s Syndrome) who do not have any Intellectual Impairment or any learning difficulties, there is already a range of options within the current curriculum offerings.       These options should continue to be provided and expanded as the Australian Curriculum and the Queensland Studies Authority curriculum offerings/endorsed subjects are implemented.
  2.  Students with mild or moderate Intellectual Impairment or Hearing Impairment, Vision Impairment, Physical Impairment, Speech-Language Impairment or Autism Spectrum Disorder with mild or moderate Intellectual Impairment or learning difficulties, there should be a suite of curriculum materials that covers a wide range of learning areas. This should include the Learning Areas from both the Australian and the Queensland Curriculum.. Some subjects should to be core and others electives similar to the offerings that are available for other Senior Secondary Students. This group of students also need access to Vocational Education at the Certificate Level 1-4
  3.  For Students with severe Intellectual / Multiple Impairment (who may have other disabilities but for whom Intellectual Impairment is the major impairment area that impacts on their learning needs) and who may need symbol support for most learning and communication, there should also be a suite of curriculum offerings.       Those designing these curriculum offerings need to be cognisant of the students’ need to use symbols and other alternate forms of communication to engage with their learning. This group of students also need access to some Vocational Education, but it may not be at the Certificate Level or may not be all of the modules of a Certificate. Curriculum Authorities should develop some courses at a level prior to Certificate 1, but with a work and future lifestyle focus. The courses/subjects for these students with a more significant Intellectual Impairment who need symbol support for most learning and communication must align with their move to post school life.
  4.  For Students who have profound Intellectual Impairment and/or profound Multiple Impairment there should be a curriculum similar to that offered within the Towards Level 1 of the Victorian Essential Learning Standards and its accompanying Ability Based Learning and Educational Support (ABLES) materials and/or additional materials provided by ACARA that expand and revise the previously provided Progressing to Foundation documents with embedded young adult contexts.       The QSA and DETE should then provide additional support to schools in a similar manner as occurs with Curriculum to the Classroom (C2C) for all other Australian Curriculum provisions.

 

CON 14 Program – Friday

         Friday 6th June

8.00 Registration & Networking – Coffee / Tea on arrival
8.30 Key Note Address 8:

Peter Blatch, Assistant Regional Director, Special and Specific Purpose Schools, Metropolitan Region

SPECIAL EDUCATION LEADERSHIP: Looking Back And Looking Forward

9.15 Key Note Address 9:

Claude Jones, Barry Rieck, Nicole Morey,

ONESCHOOL: Supporting Students With Disability More Effectively

10.15 Sponsors / Housekeeping
10.30 Morning Tea
11.15 Key Note Address 10:

Stavroula Zandes, Director, Think Health Wellbeing

HEALTH AND WELLBEING

12.15 Key Note Address 11:

Professor Pankaj Sah, Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland

HOW WE LEARN, REMEMBER AND UNLEARN: The Neuroscience of Learning and Education

1.00 Lunch and School Performance
Room:

Theme:

Chair:

Roosevelt

Early Years

Sandra Schuptar

Kennedy

MSSWD

Reno Tieppo

Lincoln

Complex Learners

Ric Day

Westminster

Health and Wellbeing

Susan Christensen

Washington

Aspiring Leaders

Tracy Cronin

1.45 Workshop 31 Workshop 32 Workshop 33 Workshop 34 Workshop 35
PREP CLASSROOMS FOR ALL

Raelee Randall, Bernadette Flowers and Mandy Burns

AVT-ECD

North Coast Region

 

 

MENTAL HEALTH – HUB OF CAPABILITY

Brian Day

DETE

 

ADAPTING THE AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM FOR COMPLEX LEARNERS

Alexandra Wallace and

Deborah Dowling

Ipswich Special School

ACHIEVING POSITIVE WORK-LIFE BALANCE

Stavroula Zandes, Director

Think Health Wellbeing

DEMYSTIFYING THE EQ APPLICATION WRITING PROCESS

Jenny Horchner-Wilson

QASEL

Vice President

Peter Blatch

ARD Special Schools Metropolitan Region

2.45 Workshop 36 Workshop 37 Workshop 38 Workshop 39 Workshop 40
SENSORY PATTERNS IN CHILDREN

Chrissy Hamilton

Mount Ommaney Special School

 

 

THE ‘AUSLAN STUDENT’ IN YOUR SCHOOL

Bronwyn Green, Manager

Auslan Project

DETE

 

ACTIVE LEARNING AND THE AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM

Annette Wellard

Narbethong Special School

 

SUPPORTING SEXUALITY AND RELATIONSHIPS EDUCATION PROGRAMS

Ipswich Cluster HOCs and Family Planning QLD

DEMYSTIFYING THE EQ APPLICATION INTERVIEW PROCESS

Jenny Horchner-Wilson

QASEL

Vice President

Peter Blatch

ARD Special Schools Metropolitan Region

CON 14 Program – Thursday

             Thursday 5th June

8.00 Registration & Networking – Coffee / Tea on arrival
8.30 Key Note Address 4:

Dr Jim Watterston, Director General, Department of Education, Training and Employment (Queensland)

WHAT SCHOOL LEADERS CAN DO TO CHANGE RESULTS BY CHANGING THE WAY THEY WORK WITH OTHERS

9.00 Key Note Address 5:

Dr Alma Harris, Professor and Director, Institute of Educational Leadership, University of Malaya and Pro-Director (Leadership) Institute of Education University of London.

DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP AND HIGH PERFORMANCE

10.15 Sponsors / Housekeeping
10.30 Morning Tea
11.00 Sponsors / Housekeeping
11.15 Key Note Address 6:

Steve Francis, Leading Educator, Author, Researcher, Consultant

SUSTAINING SANITY AND SATISFACTION IN TIMES OF CHANGE – AND STILL HAVE A LIFE

12.15 Key Note Address 7: NDIS, Pre-Planning for Schools

Mark Edmonds, Queenslanders with Disability Network

NATIONAL DISABILITY INSURANCE SCHEME: Preparing Students, Families And Teachers For The Change

1.00 Lunch and School Performance
Room:

Theme:

Chair:

Roosevelt

Leadership

Trish Thiedeman

Kennedy

Communication

Roselynne Anderson

Lincoln

Senior Schooling

Megan Cameron

Westminster

HOSES 101

Kathy Johns

Washington

Technology

Lyn Buxton

1.45 Workshop 16 Workshop 17 Workshop 18 Workshop 19 Workshop 20
DEVELOPING DISTRIBUTIVE LEADERSHIP THROUGH PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES: A PRACTICAL APPROACH

(WORKSHOP REPEATED)

Dr Alma Harris and Michelle Jones

University of Malaya

PHATIC COMMUNICATION AND DISABILITY

Ben Holt and

Louise Ruzic

Mount Ommaney Special School

AUTHENTIC TRANSITION PATHWAYS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITY

Kylie Glencross

Aspley Special School

CROSSING THE DIVIDE

Belinda Russell

Pine Rivers

Special School

ONESCHOOL MASTER SUPPORT PROVISIONS

Penny Terrill

Dawson River and Central Highlands Cluster

2.45 Workshop 21 Workshop 22 Workshop 23 Workshop 24 Workshop 25
DEVELOPING DISTRIBUTIVE LEADERSHIP THROUGH PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES: A PRACTICAL APPROACH

(WORKSHOP REPEATED)

Dr Alma Harris and Michelle Jones

University of Malaya

HOW TO USE VISUALS, ROUTINES AND TARGETS TO PROMOTE POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR FOR STUDENTS WITH ASD

Nicholas Alexander

Pine Rivers

Special School

THE POWER OF PATH

Corina Searchfield

Clifford Park Special School

CLASSROOM PROFILING: A PEDAGOGICAL FOCUS

Carolyn Bofinger

Mitchelton State School SEP

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY – SUSTAINABILITY BEYOND MSSWD

Jeff Souter

DETE

3.45
4.00 Workshop 26 Workshop 27 Workshop 28 Workshop 29 Workshop 30
PERFORMANCE CONVERSATIONS THAT IMPROVE PERFORMANCE

Nick Burnett

Growth Coaching International

COMMUNICATION

RESOURCE PORTFOLIO

Fleur Watson

and Melissa Bakes

Mitchelton Special School

STEP-UP TO EMPLOYMENT

Charmaine Driver and Lyndall Hayes

Darling Point Special School

THE HOSES AND SEP TEACHERS HANDBOOK/ INDUCTION

Trevor Firth

QASEL

Life Member

NATIONALLY CONSISTENT COLLECTION OF DATA

Mark Hohnke

DETE

5.00 Close
6.30 Pre-dinner Drinks (cash bar)
7.00 Conference Dinner (included in 3 day registration)

Dinner Speaker: Dr Alma Harris             Entertainment: DJ Andy T

CON14 Program – Wednesday

          Wednesday 4th June

8.00 Registration & Networking – Coffee / Tea on arrival
8.30 Opening Address:Chesleigh Hargreaves, QASEL President
9.00 Official Opening: Hon John-Paul Langbroek, Minister for Education, Training and Employment (Queensland)
9.30 Key Note Address 1: Anna Brazier, Director, MSSWD, Student Support, State Schools – Operations

AN OVERVIEW OF MORE SUPORT FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (MSSWD)

10.15 Sponsors / Housekeeping
10.30 Morning Tea
11.00 Sponsors / Housekeeping
11.15 Key Note Address 2:Louisa Rennie, Director, Australian Principal Certification

QUALITY EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP RECOGNISED THROUGH PRINCIPAL CERTIFICATION

12.15 Key Note Address 3: Chris Rider, CEO Queensland Studies Authority (QSA)

LEADERSHIP CREDIBILITY

1.00 Lunch and School Performance
Room:Theme:

Chair:

RooseveltQSA

Kevin Grace

KennedyCurriculum

Andrew Hawke

LincolnLeadership

Beth Devonshire

Westminster 

Andrew Thompson

WashingtonConversations

Michael Brett

1.45 Workshop 1 Workshop 2 Workshop 3 Workshop 4 Workshop 5
GUIDELINE FOR INDIVIDUAL LEARNING: LEARNING EXPECTATIONS FOR SENIOR STUDENTS WORKING TOWARDS THE QLD CERTIFICATE OF INDIVIDUAL ACHIEVEMENT Kerri Gorman and Terry Gallagher

Qld Studies Authority

LITERACY AND iPADSSarah Phippard and

Michele Scott

Ipswich West Special School

RAISING THE GAME THROUGH the ART & SCIENCE of TEACHINGJayson Gilbert

Pine Rivers Special School

DISABILITY DISCRIMINATION ACT 1992 (Cth): AN OVERVIEW OF THE LAW APPLIED IN STATE SCHOOLS

Anna Sexton

DETE Legal Branch

 

PAST IGNITIONS – ARE THE EMBERS STILL BURNING:SOME HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

Dr John Enchelmaier

QASEL

Life Member

2.45 Workshop 6 Workshop 7 Workshop 8 Workshop 9 Workshop 10
ADJUSTED SUBJECT AREA SYLLABUSES FOR SENIOR STUDENTS WORKING TOWARDS THE QCIAKathryn Tully and Joanne Gordan

Qld Studies Authority

 

IMPLEMENTING THE AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM Gail Williams

Clifford Park Special School

LEADING A SWPBS REFORM AND CHANGE PROCESSWITH A DIFFERENCE

Nicole Finch

Sunnybank Special School

INTENSIVE INTERACTION: BUILDING QUUENSLAND COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICEJanee Williamson

DETE

Sue Lowry

Southport Special School

CLASSROOM COOKINGVS HOME ECONOMICS:

THERE IS A BIG DIFFERENCE

Erin Cleary

Pine Rivers Special School

3.45
4.00 Workshop 11 Workshop 12 Workshop 13 Workshop 14 Workshop 15
CERTIFICATION OPTIONS FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDSTrish Haupt and Colleen Palmer

Qld Studies Authority

MAKING WHOLE SCHOOL ASSESSMENT WORKCatriona Pine and Elle Angwin

Calamvale Special School

CURRICULUM RENEWAL IN A SPECIAL SCHOOLAndrea Golding

Geebung Special School

ONESCHOOL AND MSSWD PROJECTJohn Faragher

DETE

MACKAY DISTRICT SPECIAL SCHOOL’S ASDAN JOURNEYSharon Davis and Vanessa Hill

Mackay District Special School

5.00 Welcome Reception (included in registration)